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  1. #1

    Default Cavediving in France

    I was again a week cavediving in France, in the Lot area. This time without CCR, and there was 1 backmount diver with us. I dove 50/50 backmount and sidemount. We had quite low waterlevels. So that means in the Truffe we had to climb out and then do the other sump. Not a long walk (10-15m) and doable with a twinset. We have done 6 different caves in 13 dives with a divetime of 1093 minutes. We did the Ressel, Cunhac, Truffe, Landenouse, Lantouy and St. Georges.
    Here some pictures:



















    The waterlevel before the first dive


    Waterlevel after the first dive (we had rain):






    A small dry cave:


    The entrance of a really beautifull cave. You have to cross the river by swimming Cunhac is one of my favorites here.


  2. #2
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    Thanks for the photos. I miss the Lot. It's been two years since we've been and I can't wait to go back. Roaming around the countryside is as entertaining as the caves. I had zero sump experience and am not a big fan of dry caving (it bores me honestly), so the first time I came across the first sump in Truffe and had to climb across it it weirded me out. I still find crossing a dry sump in an underwater cave unnerving and stressful. I don't stress out doing a normal cave dive, but as soon as I have to cross a sump I get weird voices in my head. I start thinking about slipping and hurting myself or catching a seal on a jagged rock and having a full seal failure in that cold water. I've gotten better, but it's really weird to me. Even the airbell in St Georges creeped me out, though it was amazing. Did you take that jump up to the airbell in Ressel where someone's placed a plastic figurine wearing a climbing harness? I was not expecting it as I popped my head out of the water.

    Thanks for the memories.


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rddvet View Post
    Thanks for the photos. I miss the Lot. It's been two years since we've been and I can't wait to go back. Roaming around the countryside is as entertaining as the caves. I had zero sump experience and am not a big fan of dry caving (it bores me honestly), so the first time I came across the first sump in Truffe and had to climb across it it weirded me out. I still find crossing a dry sump in an underwater cave unnerving and stressful. I don't stress out doing a normal cave dive, but as soon as I have to cross a sump I get weird voices in my head. I start thinking about slipping and hurting myself or catching a seal on a jagged rock and having a full seal failure in that cold water. I've gotten better, but it's really weird to me. Even the airbell in St Georges creeped me out, though it was amazing. Did you take that jump up to the airbell in Ressel where someone's placed a plastic figurine wearing a climbing harness? I was not expecting it as I popped my head out of the water.

    Thanks for the memories.
    The "sump" is the part with the water. I think you are talking about the "dry" passage between the sumps.

    FWIW, I miss the Lot too. What I found funny was a British guy I was with with asked me what I thought of French caves. I said, they remind me of Florida caves. He laughed, and said "when I first went to Florida, I said the caves reminded me of French caves"

    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FW View Post
    The "sump" is the part with the water. I think you are talking about the "dry" passage between the sumps.

    FWIW, I miss the Lot too. What I found funny was a British guy I was with with asked me what I thought of French caves. I said, they remind me of Florida caves. He laughed, and said "when I first went to Florida, I said the caves reminded me of French caves"
    Thats what I meant. It gets confusing because in france I think they call the dry section the sumpf? Or am I just confused. Either way climbing out is creepy. I'd like to enjoy it more. I'm sure just like cave diving, experience helps.

    French caves are like florida caves. Except much better surroundings.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rddvet View Post
    Thats what I meant. It gets confusing because in france I think they call the dry section the sumpf? Or am I just confused. Either way climbing out is creepy. I'd like to enjoy it more. I'm sure just like cave diving, experience helps.

    French caves are like florida caves. Except much better surroundings.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I don't know much French. Here, and in England, they refer to the underwater part as sump, and the part in between as cave passage. The only exception is Wookey hole, where they first went in through the water, and when they got to air, they called it a "Chamber".

    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers

  6. #6

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    France has a lot of sump caves. That mean dry passages. Sump is the water part.

    There are syphoning caves too, inflow. A siphon in french is a sump. I believeyou call peacock 3 a syphon.
    The Lot area has only outflow caves, except 1 passage at the entrance of Trou madame. But that is dangerous to dive.

    The truffe can be done by swimming from sump 1 to 2 in high levels, a short way of 20m on your knees to 3. This time the level was not high enough to swim, but the walk to 2 was easy. No need to take things out. To sump 3 you need sidemount.

    Combe negre means in high levels you can go as far as turn pressure with 2 cylinders without getting out of the water. In sidemount you pass the sumps by staying on fins with head above the water.
    In low levels almost nobody goes in it. Too hard.

    Even the Ressel and the st. Georges are sump caves, but the first sump or siphon is long enough to dive and turn before you reach the end of the sump. Caves are outflowing.

    Trou madame is a 2 hour work to get in. Then you can dive really nice. Normally you can swimm between sumps.



 

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