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  1. #1
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    Default SiTech drysuit exhaust valve disassembly (by Lynne Flaherty)

    Sadly, the pictures didn't get saved. I am in the process of recreating them, but it is hard to know what Lynne had originally. I will have to shoot the missing ones tonight, stay tuned...

    Before disassembling the valve, try rinsing it out. FIrst remove it from the suit. Then hold the threaded opening to a hose, and spray through the valve to wash out any grit that may be holding the mushroom valve open.

    SiTech drysuit exhaust valve disassembly
    When I wanted to take mine apart to clean Carmel River Beach sand out of it, I couldn't find anything on line to tell me how. Most posts said not to try it, because it was too fragile. After soaking and blowing it out failed, it was a loss anyway, so I went for it. It's surprisingly simple to do.

    Apparently there are instructions in the Airspeed Press drysuit book, but for those, like me, who look to the web first, I thought I'd post a photo essay on how it goes.

    To begin with, you unscrew the outer portion of the valve from the portion which is inside the suit. If you then inspect the outer portion of the valve, you will find a slot in it which will admit the blade of a 3/16" screwdriver.

    Picture 1 slot

    (Slot is just to the left of the tip of the arrow)

    Insert screwdriver and carefully twist. The cap will begin to lift, and you can work the screwdriver along the resulting gap to remove the cap.

    Picture 2 pry.jpg

    Picture 3 cap-off

    Setting the cap aside (righthand piece), unscrew the remainder of the valve as though you were opening the valve all the way. You will then be able to lift out the flat, fenestrated piece that you see on the left. This piece is attached to the spring, and in the end of the spring is a cap, which is the piston that pushes against the diaphragm in the valve. The piston may fall out when you lift the spring portion.

    Picture 4 Piston

    Picture 5 Last Piece

    The top picture is the piston, which may fall out. The bottom picture is the last piece of the assembly, which will simply lift out at this point, exposing the diaphragm. It was in here that I found the debris I had to clean out to fix the valve.

    Picture 6

    To reassemble, reverse the process, with the following additional considerations:

    When you place the spring piece back into the assembly, there are flat plates on the underlying piece to align it.

    Picture 7 slot-lineup.jpg

    And when you go to replace the cap, you have to align a tab on the cap with a slot on the lower portion of the valve.

    Picture 8 cap-tab.jpg

    Picture 9 inner-slot.jpg

    As far as I can tell, the only step in the process where you could possibly damage the assembly is in prying off the cap or replacing it, and if it is done gently, that won't happen. It does wear the slot to pry it off, however, and I suspect there is a limit to the number of times one can successfully do it before the slot no longer serves its purpose.

    Anyway, I hope this will help somebody else. Forgive me for imprecise or inaccurate terminology -- the pictures should really speak for themselves.

    Last edited by FW; 05-04-2016 at 08:29 PM.
    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers

  2. #2
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    Default

    This is the junk that washed out, with a toothbrush for scale:


    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers

  3. #3

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    For whats it's worth, I added an additional edit to Lynne's exhaust valve thread, when it was on DiveMatrix, which I will add here.

    After a few trips to North Florida, I noticed that my exhaust valve became increasingly difficult to tension. Disassembly showed no debris and it took me a few tries to figure out the problem.

    I assume that the sun on the black exhaust valve made the valve shell susceptible to slight warp-age. This, in turn would cause the flat, fenestrated piece, which threads up and down within the valve housing during tensioning, to bind.

    I found that using fine sandpaper, or a 3M scouring pad, to slightly polish the rim/edge of the fenestrated piece was sufficient to eliminate the binding. It's a simple fix I've now used on a few SiTech exhaust valves that exhibited this problem and it's a pretty minor adjustment once you have the valve disassembled.

    Larry

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkCoffee View Post
    For whats it's worth, I added an additional edit to Lynne's exhaust valve thread, when it was on DiveMatrix, which I will add here.

    After a few trips to North Florida, I noticed that my exhaust valve became increasingly difficult to tension. Disassembly showed no debris and it took me a few tries to figure out the problem.

    I assume that the sun on the black exhaust valve made the valve shell susceptible to slight warp-age. This, in turn would cause the flat, fenestrated piece, which threads up and down within the valve housing during tensioning, to bind.

    I found that using fine sandpaper, or a 3M scouring pad, to slightly polish the rim/edge of the fenestrated piece was sufficient to eliminate the binding. It's a simple fix I've now used on a few SiTech exhaust valves that exhibited this problem and it's a pretty minor adjustment once you have the valve disassembled.
    Good information, thanks!

    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers

  5. #5
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    Default

    Am I the only person who does a complete drysuit rinse after every dive trip?

    Then again, considering how many divers don't even rinse their regs (but it's fresh water!) I probably am.

    Whoever said money can't buy love never bought a puppy.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slüdge View Post
    Am I the only person who does a complete drysuit rinse after every dive trip?

    Then again, considering how many divers don't even rinse their regs (but it's fresh water!) I probably am.
    Probably . Unless it's covered with duck weed.

    roadkill

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slüdge View Post
    Am I the only person who does a complete drysuit rinse after every dive trip?

    Then again, considering how many divers don't even rinse their regs (but it's fresh water!) I probably am.
    The problem I was having was while I was still in the water. I couldn't even turn the dump valve. Grit had gotten in during the dive. FWIW, I had just removed it and rinsed it through the mushroom valve a day before the dive.

    Forrest Wilson (with 2 Rs)
    Any opinions are personal.
    Sump Divers


 

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